The findings from the many projects of the Fram Centre in Tromsø are indispensable as input to
dialogue, and as a basis for policies to meet the challenges of Arctic change, writes Ola Elvestuen, Minister of Climate and Environment.

The Arctic climate is changing rapidly, driven by global greenhouse gas emissions. The Arctic as we
know it is being replaced by a warmer, wetter and more unpredictable environment. This
transformation has profound implications for ecosystems, resources and people both in the Arctic
and worldwide.
Facing these changes, we have two main tasks. First, we must limit climate change through rapid and
severe reductions of greenhouse gas emissions. Second, we have to understand and adapt to the
changes ahead.

The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change shows that the difference
between 1, 5 and 2.0 degrees of global warming will make a major difference with regard to impacts.
This is of profound importance for the Arctic, which warms 2-3 times faster than the global average.
In the Arctic, as elsewhere, adaptation is much more likely to be successful if we also succeed with
limiting global warming.
Scientific knowledge is our key to understanding the likely implications of our actions – or inaction.
Knowledge about the risks and consequences in a warmer and wetter Arctic is also the key to
navigate and adapt to future change.

Arctic Frontiers links policymakers and people doing business in the Arctic with the science
community to discuss what the latest findings of Arctic science mean for policy and business. This makes Arctic Frontiers an important arena not only for fruitful discussions, but also to initiate action
to mitigate and adapt to the changes ahead.

The findings from the many projects of the Fram Centre here in Tromsø are indispensable as input to
this dialogue, and as a basis for policies to meet the challenges of Arctic change. The Fram Centre
consists of scientists from 21 institutions involved in interdisciplinary research and outreach in the
fields of natural science, technology and social sciences, making valuable contributions to the
knowledge base we need to adapt and build resilient Arctic communities.

The theme «Smart Arctic» underlines that to succeed in this rapidly changing region we have to be
smart. We have to base our decisions, policies and business strategies on the best available
knowledge, and on a firm will to find sustainable solutions.
I wish all participants fruitful and smart discussions during Arctic Frontiers in Tromsø.

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